Blog: Why is Mr. Petrov so engaged?

Mona J. MølnvikBlogger: Mona J. Mølnvik

In a small room «hidden» in a laboratory at Gløshaugen in the city of Trondheim, Norway, a meeting took place this week between the PhD student Snorre Foss Westman from NTNU, Researcher Sigmund E. Størset from SINTEF Energy Research and Scientific Officer Mr. Petrov from the European Commission.

Mr. Petrov was visiting to discuss the mid-term evaluation of the EU project IMPACTS under the 7th Framework Programme. One objective of IMPACTS is to develop the CO2 quality knowledge base required for defining norms and regulations to ensure safe and reliable design, construction and operation of CO2 pipelines and injection equipment.

Since Mr. Petrov already was visiting Trondheim, he wanted to see relevant laboratory activities. The test-rig that Mr. Petrov inspected, is found in a slightly worn room. This does not go for the equipment that will generate data on phase equilibrium of CO2 mixtures. This equipment, which holds more «Rolls Royce standard» is not possible to buy anywhere, it had to be developed by the researchers, and the hurdles to overcome to achieve the desired accuracy have been many and challenging.

From left SINTEF researcher Sigmund Ø. Størset, scientific officer at the European Commission Petre Petrov, and doctoral student Snorre Foss Westman

From left SINTEF researcher Sigmund Ø. Størset, scientific officer at the European Commission Petre Petrov, and doctoral student Snorre Foss Westman. (Photo: SINTEF)

What makes Mr. Petrov is so engaged is that he has just learned that the equipment developed in the KPN project CO2Mix under the FME BIGCCS, can probably provide the most accurate data for the phase equilibrium of CO2 mixtures world-wide.

This means that when Snorre has made his data-sets for a specific mixture and temperature, it is not necessary to repeat them. It is perhaps a little sad, but not when you consider how many possible mixtures of CO2 there are.

And what do we need such data for? In a future where much of the CO2 emissions must be addressed, i.e. they must be collected, transported and injected into the subsurface, it is crucial that this is done in a safe and efficient manner. Knowledge of the state of gas mixes – i.e. if the mixture is in the gas phase or the liquid phase at different pressures and temperatures will be critical for designing efficient and safe transport of CO2.

And what does it mean? Yes, that means that this work helps scientists make large-scale implementation of CCS possible.